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How to make tofu at home

1*Servings 2 blocks of tofu

INGREDIENTS

  • 500 grams dry organic GMO-free soybeans
  • 3.5 litters filtered water (for making the milk) and additional water for soaking the beans
  • 1.5 tsp gypsum powder (calcium sulfate) or 1.5 medium-sized lemons (juiced)

TOOLS

  • Cheesecloth or Muslin cloth, or alternatively nut milk bag
  • A tofu mould or a square bowl/tray to shape the tofu
  • Skimmer spoon


INSTRUCTIONS


  1. Begin by soaking the soybeans for at least 6 hours, or even overnight. They will expand 2-3 times their size so make sure to use a large enough bowl and plenty of water.
  2. Add the soaked beans into the Nutramilk processor for just 10-15 seconds to break down the beans slightly.
  3. Add the water and blend again until smooth and creamy.
  4. Transfer the mixture into a large pot, though a sieve to collect the pulp. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Stir occasionally and remove the foam 'skin' that forms on the top with a wooden spoon.


Method 1- The Gypsum Method:

  • In the meantime, mix the gypsum powder with a little water and stir well.
  • As soon as the soy milk is boiling, switch off the heat and add the diluted gypsum. Stir carefully a few times then set aside. Curdles will start forming.
  • Once the bowl is filled with curdles then put a muslin cloth over a mould and transfer the milk curdles with a skimmer spoon. Wrap the cloth tightly around the milk curdles.
  • Put a heavy object to press down the muslin cloth. This will allow the tofu to form and harden
  • Within 20 minutes, your firm tofu is ready. Less firm (softer) tofu would be ready faster, so check after 5-10 minutes and continue to press, as needed.
  • Keep in an airtight container in the fridge for 3-4 days. Remember, if you’re not planning on eating it the same day that you make it then it’s best to store it in a container filled with filtered cold water and change this daily, as tofu dries out quickly.

When you want to cook it – Once you’ve drained the tofu then you can blot it with paper towels, press it to get out any excess water before cooking as you please. 

METHOD 2 – with Lemon juice:

Having soaked your beans and made the milk, as mentioned above, it’s time to continue with the lemon juice tofu method:

  • Transfer the mixture into a large pot and bring to a soft boil over low-medium heat. Stir occasionally and remove the foam ‘skin’ that forms on the top with a wooden spoon.
  • In the meantime, juice the lemons. As soon as the milk starts boiling, add the lemon juice and remove from the heat.
  • Stir carefully a few times then set aside. Curdles will start forming.
  • If no curdles are forming, turn the heat on for a couple of minutes and add a few more drops of lemon juice.
  • Once the bowl is filled with curdles ( this can take different times each time- so it’s hard to pinpoint) then put a muslin cloth over a mould and transfer the milk curdles with a skimmer spoon. Wrap the cloth tightly around the milk curdles.
  • Put a heavy object oven the cloth, to press it. This will allow the tofu to form and harden and get rid of excess liquid.
  • Within 20 minutes, your firm tofu is ready. If you’d like it to be softer then check after 5-10 minutes and continue to press, as needed.

This lemon tofu can be stored the same way as the above method – Kept in an airtight container in the fridge for 3-4 days.
And remember, fofu dries out quickly so it’s best to keep is stored in filtered water. You can then press the tofu, as needed, before cooking. 

A few notes about tofu:


We thought we´d answear a few of what we think are the top FAQ´s for tofu here:
  1. Firstly, yes it can be eaten raw. There isn’t much flavour to it at this point but it’s perfectly edible
  2. Yes, tofu can also be frozen – for 4-5 months. Freezing does change the texture of tofu – however, it’s often seen as a good thing. If you freeze and thaw your tofu before cooking it, it will make it more ‘pocket-y’ and retain more flavour, becoming crispier crispy tofu when fried, but also has a chewier – more ‘meaty’ texture than if not frozen.
  3. It is possible to flavour your tofu at home but I haven’t tried this yet, as I usually add mine to sauces and high-flavour dishes anyway. However, it’s possible to flavour in a way similar to cheese – with herbs spices and ‘sundries’ like olives and sundried tomatoes. Just be careful not to add too much so the curds don’t solidify together.
  4. what does tofu taste like is a question I feel like all newbies struggle to find an answer to because the answer is – not much! I love this though, as it allows you to mould it to